CLASS
The Moveable Feast features literary luncheons with exciting authors at area restaurants on Fridays, 11 am - 1 pm, $30 each with a $5 cash rebate if the featured book is purchased. Email or call 843-235-9600 for more information. Click here to register online!

CLASS

Friday 11/23/2018 at 11:00 AM
Libby Bernardin
(Stones Ripe for Sowing) at Caffe Piccolo
The author of two prior books of poetry, Bernardin has crafted a haunting collection from a life well lived and carefully examined. These stunning poems question and affirm while eschewing answers. Firmly grounded in the natural world, she trains her gaze deep into our very nature and existence, addressing loss and grief, aging, wonder, and joy, all the contradictions of our human existence with language that is at once lyrical and precise.
$30
CLASS
Tuesday 11/27/2018 at 11:00 AM
Nanette Davidson
(The Folk School Cookbook) at Kimbel's, Wachesaw Plantation
Arranged by the seasons, the 336-page hardcover book features Southern Appalachian cooking, as well as cuisine from other parts of the world — especially those that have helped to shape the history of the John C. Campbell Folk School. Regulars will recognize dining hall favorites, Fall Festival fare, Appalachian classics, and treats made for holidays and special events. Author Davidson, Folk School Resident Artist in Cooking, meticulously collected and curated more than 200 recipes, including some of the most memorable recipes served family-style in the school's Dining Hall over the decades. The beautifully photographed book makes a unique and treasured gift!
$30
CLASS
Friday 11/30/2018 at 11:00 AM
Therese Fowler & John Kessel - FULL!
(A Well Behaved Woman and Pride and Prometheu) at Southern Comforts in the Hammock Shops (venue change)
Our first husband-and-wife authors on the same ticket, separate novels, different genres! Therese Fowler is the author of the bestseller and television series "Z: The Story of Zelda Fitzgerald" who returns with "one of the most anticipated books of Fall 2018" (Publishers Weekly), "A Well-Behaved Woman," the dramatic and compelling Gilded Age tale of Alva Smith, the young woman who married William K. Vanderbilt and launched the Vanderbilt dynasty as we know it today. Kirkus, in a starred review, calls it "nothing short of mesmerizing." The logline for John Kessel's new novel is "Pride and Prejudice meets Frankenstein" as Mary Bennet falls for the enigmatic Victor Frankenstein and befriends his monstrous Creature in this clever fusion of two popular classics. Threatened with destruction unless he fashions a wife for his Creature, Victor Frankenstein travels to England where he meets Mary and Kitty Bennet, the remaining unmarried sisters of the Bennet family from "Pride and Prejudice." As Mary and Victor become increasingly attracted to each other, the Creature looks on impatiently, waiting for his bride. But where will Victor find a female body from which to create the monster’s mate?
$30
CLASS
Tuesday 12/04/2018 at 11:00 AM
Rea Frey - Rescheduled Post-Florence
(Not Her Daughter) at 21 Main, North Myrtle Beach
The author of four best-selling nonfiction books on nutrition and fitness, Frey’s debut novel has already been optioned for a feature film. Described as "cleverly constructed," "a provocative thriller," "harrowing and heartfelt," Frey pulls off a difficult task: balancing a nail-biting plot with a thought-provoking question – is a crime committed with the best intentions still a crime? The story begs the question: who is more mother – the one who gives birth or the one who rescues? A chilling, powerful tale of love and sacrifice, of truth and perception, this book will make you miss your bedtime, guaranteed. Includes book.
$48
CLASS
Friday 12/07/2018 at 11:00 AM
James M. Scott
(Rampage: MacArthur, Yamashita and the Battle of Manila) at Inlet Affairs
American General Douglas MacArthur, driven from the Philippines under the cover of darkness at the beginning of World War II, famously vowed to return. This is the untold story of his homecoming. The 29-day battle to retake Manila resulted in the catastrophic destruction of the city and a rampage by Japanese soldiers and marines that terrorized the civilian population. Landmarks were demolished, houses torched, suspected resistance fighters were tortured and killed, countless women raped, and their husbands and children murdered. An estimated 100,000 civilians were slain in a massacre as heinous as “The Rape of Nanking.” Based on extensive research in the Philippines and the United States, war crimes testimony, after-action reports, and survivor interviews, "Rampage" recounts one of the most heartbreaking chapters of the Pacific war. Scott is a Pulitzer Prize finalist ("Target Tokyo"), the author of several critically acclaimed books of military history ("The War Below" and "The Attack on Liberty"), and a frequent speaker at military bases, presidential libraries, book festivals, universities and museums and on news media.
$30
CLASS
Tuesday 12/11/2018 at 11:00 AM
Elizabeth Berg
(Night of Miracles) at Pawleys Plantation
The sequel to "The Story of Arthur Truluv," this 21st book by New York Times best-selling author Elizabeth Berg can be read as a stand-alone book. It focuses on the fictional town of Mason, Missouri, and the characters who live there, especially the seemingly irascible Lucille, who has begun teaching baking classes in the town. You are also introduced to new characters: Monica, a waitress at Polly's Henhouse, and Tiny, a cab driver who is head over heels about Monica but can't quite make his feelings known. Iris is a new resident of the town who has left Boston to try to forge a new life and get over a divorce. And you meet Abby, who is dealing a terrible diagnosis affecting not only her but her husband and 10-year old son. This novel is meant to provide comfort and offer hope, and to remind us all of the goodness inherent in every person.
$30
CLASS
Friday 12/14/2018 at 11:00 AM
Minuette Floyd
(A Place to Worship: African American Camp Meetings in the Carolinas) at Ocean One, Litchfield
Camp meetings – also called revivals – originated with circuit-riding Methodist preachers who gathered congregations in open fields and town squares. However, the sermons had messages that were not always welcomed by mainstream Protestant churches in the colonial and antebellum South. With the help of white itinerant preachers, enslaved African Americans organized their own camp meetings in conjunction with the white revivals. These celebratory events were predominantly spiritual, with preaching, worship, and communion, but also offered a chance for family reunions. After the Civil War, independent African American congregations built on this antebellum heritage by establishing permanent camps that continue to welcome meetings today. In "A Place to Worship," Dr. Floyd shares an intimate portrait of the culture, traditions, and long history of the camp meeting as one of the most vital institutions in the lives of rural African Americans in North and South Carolina. As a child Floyd attended camp meetings each year in North Carolina, and she renewed her interest in them as an adult. For the past eighteen years Floyd has traveled to campgrounds throughout the Carolinas, documenting the annual tradition through photographs and interviews. Floyd has sought to record not only a visual record of the places and practices of each, but also the rich and inspiring stories of the people who make them thrive.
$30
CLASS
Friday 12/21/2018 at 11:00 AM
Richard Rankin
(While There Were Still Wild Birds) at Carefree Catering
This is a personal history of Southern quail hunting as it was lived at three different South Carolina quail hunting clubs and by related dog trainers, hunting guides, and hunters. The author's father, Richard E. Rankin, Sr., belonged to the first hunting club in Kline, South Carolina, and was a founding partner in the second hunting club, the Quail Roost Hunt Club, outside Manning, South Carolina. The third club featured was the Foreston Hunt Club, an adjoining neighbor of the Quail Roost Hunt Club. As a family member, hunt club partner, and historian, Rankin tells this story as both a participant and as an objective observer. This study covers a span of time from the mid-1930s – when Southern quail hunting was still a popular and important field sport – through and after the mid-1980s when the massive collapse of the quail population ended wild bird hunting. The book explores the character and meaning of Southern quail hunting in a particular setting. It emphasizes the importance of hunting fellowship (especially between the author, his friends, father, and other hunting associates) and the way in which bird hunting leads to a dramatic encounter with wildness. Because Southern quail hunting was part of the larger culture, the book also discusses how race, gender, and environmental change impacted Southern quail hunting.
$30
CLASS
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